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width: 95% !important; width:99%; position: relative; left: 0.0%; width:101%; position: relative; left: 0.0%; " class="grey">
field_offset_to_apply[LANGUAGE_NONE][0]['value']; // echo $offset; class HijriCalendar { // define date adjustments below const DATE_ADJ = 0; function monthName($i) // $i = 1..12 { static $month = array( "Muharram", "Safar", "Rabi-Ul-Awwal", "Rabi-Uth-Thani", "Jamaad-Ul-Awwal", "Jamaad-Ul-Akhar", "Rajab", "Shabaan", "Ramadhan", "Shawal", "Zil-Qad", "Zil-Hajj" ); return $month[$i-1]; } function GregorianToHijri($time = null) { global $offset; // if($time === null) $time = time() + (self::DATE_ADJ * 24 * 3600); if($time === null) $time = time() + ($offset * 24 * 3600); $m = date('m', $time); $d = date('d', $time); $y = date('Y', $time); return HijriCalendar::JDToHijri( cal_to_jd(CAL_GREGORIAN, $m, $d, $y)); } function HijriToGregorian($m, $d, $y) { return jd_to_cal(CAL_GREGORIAN, HijriCalendar::HijriToJD($m, $d, $y)); } # Julian Day Count To Hijri function JDToHijri($jd) { $jd = $jd - 1948440 + 10632; $n = (int)(($jd - 1) / 10631); $jd = $jd - 10631 * $n + 354; $j = ((int)((10985 - $jd) / 5316)) * ((int)(50 * $jd / 17719)) + ((int)($jd / 5670)) * ((int)(43 * $jd / 15238)); $jd = $jd - ((int)((30 - $j) / 15)) * ((int)((17719 * $j) / 50)) - ((int)($j / 16)) * ((int)((15238 * $j) / 43)) + 29; $m = (int)(24 * $jd / 709); $d = $jd - (int)(709 * $m / 24); $y = 30*$n + $j - 30; return array($m, $d, $y); } # Hijri To Julian Day Count function HijriToJD($m, $d, $y) { return (int)((11 * $y + 3) / 30) + 354 * $y + 30 * $m - (int)(($m - 1) / 2) + $d + 1948440 - 385; } }; $hijri = HijriCalendar::GregorianToHijri( ); ?>

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An Experience that Cannot be Described, Only Felt! by Shifa Fathima Mugloo

Updated on 12 March 2018

No words or phrases can ever give justice to the experience felt in Iran. Each experience, each moment and each second deserves a written biography, while still leaving you in frustration for not explaining it well enough. As I left Iran with my head rested against the plane’s window, all the memories and experiences flash past my eyes. Leaving the simplest of experiences, from breathing the air of this country to walking on its roads agonizing to leave. Remembering the uncontrollable tears that fell from seeing Imam Redha (as), the awe felt in Bibi Masuma-e-Qum’s Haram and feeling the serenity and closeness in Masjid Jamkaran made leaving even harder.

This could have been an experience of just entering and leaving the shrine, however the lectures, twilight programmes and Q&A sessions brought these personalities closer to home. These personalities that once felt a distance away suddenly seemed so close. As you talked to them you could almost feel their presence listening to you. This is an experience that cannot be described, but only felt! During these three weeks I realised how versatile Islam is, that it truly is not just a religion, but a way of life. The simplest of activities like swimming had Islamic philosophy behind it as we were enlightened by Shaykh Shomali. Seeing the miracles that Prophetic medicine can do to even cancer patients or those paralysed left us in surprise and amazement. Everything is natural from the Prophet (SA) and Imams (AS) through the wisdom of Allah (SWT). Being given the opportunity to go to Hamadan, we could see the wonders of Allah’s creation in one of the rare water caves. Shaykh Nadir helped us understand how every creation of Allah (SWT) has a purpose and meaning behind it. From the architectural structure of a cave to the smallest insect on the floor - this is Allah’s creation, and this is His magnificence! It is an experience that cannot be described, but only felt.

 

On boarding the plane my heart was torn between the excitement of starting a change of life and leaving the holy cities of Qum and Mashhad. On arrival to our home countries, even though we could feel the physical distance from these personalities, we somewhat felt a new closeness to them like they are with us. We could talk to them whenever and wherever we want. Just hearing their blessed names or seeing their holy shrines bring tears to your eyes in yearning to be there again. Indeed, this is an experience that cannot be described, but only felt.  

Written by: Shifa Fathima Mugloo from London


Related News


This is an un-edited translation of selected sections of the book entitled The sunshine of Wilayat
(والیت آفتاب) from the esteemed scholar, Ayatullah Misbah Yazdi, with the hope that any benefit the
honourable reader derives from it would please the heart of my master, الفداء له روحی.


They said it was going to be fun. They said I was going to make new friends, they said that I would experience new things, and above all, they said that I would not want to leave. But that was all an understatement – they had no idea.


Updated 30 October 2013

Attending this course was a golden opportunity for me to attain spiritual upliftment and gain lots of Islamic education, along with meeting girls from various countries, and everyone had something interesting to share!